writing

be afraid

I moved house rather abruptly the week before last, which resulted in several things, including a much nicer house. But two of those things in particular are what I want to talk about here: 1) I had to set aside the things I was writing for several days; 2) I watched a lot of Forensic Files

When you're rapidly packing an entire apartment and tiredly unpacking it a few days later, you need television distractions that don't require much attention or thought, with enough episodes that it never runs out. Forensic Files is perfect. If it weren't for the Netflix pulse-check asking very few episodes if we're still watching, Forensic Files would play until the heat death of the universe. 

insert appropriate circus metaphor here

Let's talk about writers and their safety nets. 

So there was this dude over on Twitter who told a woman who was struggling with writing and life that she would be even less of a writer if she had more of a safety net. It was a fucking stupid statement, made even stupider when he expanded on it with the some bullshit about suffering and desperation leading to great art and how things like medication and food are, you know, crutches for the weak that you can choose to forgo or something blah blah blah.…

He's since deleted it in a huff, leaving in its place only an epic thread of self-pity about the meanies in outrage culture, but that doesn't really matter, because he wasn't saying anything people haven't said before. There is a lot of romanticizing of struggle, pain, poverty, and depression when people talk about writers and artists. You have to suffer to create! they say, without ever stopping to think about why they are so eager to prescribe suffering to others.

Crossover: Where Comics & Science Meet

Sunday June 2 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM

Amplified Ale Works (East Village), 1429 Island Ave, San Diego, CA 92101

Buy tickets on Eventbrite

This Sunday, June 2, I’ll be participating in a panel event organized by San Diego’s Fleet Science Center. Crossover: Where Comics & Science Meet will bring comic writers, sci fi writers, and local scientists together to discuss the creative and scientific sides of comics and science fiction.

Featuring: Tom Waltz, Writer, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (and more); John Barber, Writer, Transformers (and more) and Editor in Chief at IDW Publising; J. Dianne Dotson, Author, The Questrison Saga; Kali Wallace, Author, Salvation Day; Dr. Frances Barron, Scientist; Dr. Troy Sandberg, Scientist; Dr. Lisa Will, Scientist and the Fleet Science Center's Resident Astronomer

San Diego Festival of Books

I will be making an appearance at the San Diego Festival of Books on Saturday, August 25. Come out and see a bunch of great local authors and writers! Check out the links below for tickets and schedules.

San Diego Festival of Books

Saturday, August 25, 2018

Venues Liberty Station, 2620 Truxtun Road, San Diego, CA 92106

The Many Worlds of Middle Grade

11:25 AM  in Meeting Room 2

A discussion about magic and wonder in middle grade books with John August, Margaret Dilloway, and Kali Wallace, moderated by Sally Pla. The discussion will last 45 minutes, and the authors will be going directly to the signing area for book sales and signatures afterward.

The San Diego Festival of Book is open to everyone. Tickets are $3 for each panel and can be purchased online.

City of Islands blog & interview roundup

Here's a round-up of the blog posts and interviews I've written and given for the release of City of Islands! In them, I talk about writing for children in these dark times, the lessons I learned as a bookworm child, and the importance of fun adventures for young readers.

All of my blog posts and interviews, present and past, can be found on the Other page.

thoughts on writing short stories

In this awkward time in which I am preparing to release one novel, getting ready to edit another, and halfway through writing one vast and terrible behemoth that is going to take many, many months of work to finish, I have been working on a couple of short stories.

These are stories that have been sitting in my mind for a long time--because all short stories sit in my mind for a long time, lurking in the shadows for months or years before I feel ready to write them. It might not seem to make sense, from the outside, that I can dive into writing a novel with very little preparation but require eons of contemplation to get into a short story. But it makes sense to me, and I've been thinking about why.

getting stuck and getting unstuck

The novel I'm writing now is longer and more complex than any I've tried to write before. This is a good thing! It is exciting and epic and full of things I love and there are monsters everywhere!

But it is also long and complex and full of characters and everything is interconnected across miles of story geography and years of story time and tens of thousands of story words, which means that it is a lot to handle. I am trying to be better about thoughtful first draft writing. That is, rather than jumping head first into a story and assuming I'll figure it out later, I am trying to plan a bit more. I'm not full-on outlining, but I am trying to be more deliberate about each step I take in the story--even when that step comes as a result of a wild idea that strikes in the middle of the night.

That means than when I hit a snag--which I do all the time, because it is a big and complicated story--I try to figure out why I've hit a snag, rather than barreling through or giving up entirely. I try to think about the problem in a way that actually helps solve the problem and gets me writing again. To do this, I ask myself some questions about the story to figure out what's keeping me from moving forward.